See the goal not the pain.

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In 1998, Benoit Lecomte a french citizen settled in America crossed the Atlantic swimming. It took 80 days to swim 5980 km. Lecomte was not a professional athlete but an airline employee.

What motivated him to go all the way?

Lecomte trained for 6 years before he start crossing the ocean. He wished to pay homage to his father, who died of colon cancer, and also wanted to raise money to support research in curing cancer. Ben has raised more than 175,000 dollars.

While crossing the Atlantic, he stood in water for 6 hours a day and alongside he had a support boat that released, within a radius of 7.5 meters, a magnetic field designed to protect him against sharks. He had to eat for 4 hours a day to replace more than 9000 calories consumed while swimming in grade 8 storm conditions with winds of up to 100 km / hour and waves of 19 feet (6 meters) or had to deal with turtles, dolphins, jellyfish and incredibly cold water.

Was this man crazy to swim for 80 days, 5980 km, in spite of harsh natural conditions? No, actually he was not crazy he just had the strongest possible motivation: driven by love, attachment and spiritual connection he paid homage to his father, fulfilled a dream and asked his girlfriend to marry him.

Could you swim across the Atlantic Ocean?

(I’m not asking if you want to, but if you could do it for you, for your dreams and your goals)

The fact that we still discovering what motivates us is the key to our performance. Although Ben Lecomte‘s performance is stunning, the most important element is how he kept his motivation.
How can you achieve certain goals that are important to you?

Ben Lecomte later told that he focused on the benefits of his journey, not the pain and frustration that he had to face every day.

Think of a tedious exercise. Jogging, running the marathon, swimming, mountain riding, tennis, skiing …. What happens to us when we do these exercises and start focusing on the pain? We Stop.

“We must all suffer one of two things: the pain of discipline or the pain of regret or disappointment” – Jim Rohn

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